Published Articles


Healthwise "Learning to Listen Well" in Courier News
July 20, 2010

When I'm part of a group — or by myself, for that matter — and presumably listening to someone speak, I'll stare at my nails, gaze out a window or maybe just quietly fidget. Although I believe I am listening, my mind is elswhere. I've noticed, though, that I'm not the only one. And I've wondered, "Why is it so hard to listen when others are talking?"



People Handle Grief in Their Own Way in MyCentralJersey.com
Feb 9, 2010

My husband Ed and I lost our two children, our girls, from two different kinds of cancer: Valerie at nine from bone cancer and Stacy at thirty-seven from breast cancer. When people discover that, a disturbed look clouds their eyes and pity thickens their voices. They look at me and wonder aloud, "How does one overcome such tragedy?" I don't reply since I don't know. I haven't overcome anything.

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Gifts From the Past in The Pepper Tree Magazine
Bits of my early life emerge in sudden flashes of memory. They spring up without warning, dissipate quickly, and leave behind a faint aura of recall. Although tinged with sadness, I see them wrapped in warmth and laughter, as gifts from the past.

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AN UNORTHODOX COMMUNITY in The Star-Ledger
September 13, 2007

The radiologist pointed to a faint shadow on the chest X-ray. Maybe he's wrong, I thought. Maybe it's nothing. It certainly didn't look like much. Soon after, though, the second set of X-rays arrived and shattered all my hopes. That shadow, confirmed as a malignant lesion, had metastasized from the tumor in Val's right leg, to the lower lobe of her right lung, and now, to the two upper lobes. Since there were no other signs of cancer, the specialists agreed: remove the lung. Omygod. She's only eight!

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The Hall Clock in Overlookview.com
March 14, 2008

I saw Valerie – and the hall clock – as I raced from the elevator onto the eleventh floor of Babies Hospital. A wisp of a child, she stood with thin arms laced across her narrow chest and a comic frown transforming her small impish face. Traffic into New York City had been heavy. I was five minutes late to the hospital and in trouble.

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